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South American Games 2014

   Posted in : Multisports >> Event starts On Mar 7th, 2014. Ends at Mar 18th, 2014
The 2014 South American Games is a multi-sport event planned to take place in Santiago, Chile. It will be the 10th edition of the ODESUR South American Games. This will be the second time that Santiago has hosted this event, the first being in 1986. Most of the events will take place in and around the National Stadium. The games are planned to be held between March 7 to 18 2014.

The South American Games organised by Organizacion Deportiva Sudamericana (ODESUR) and recognised by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) are the continent's multi-sports event.

These Games are the most important competition of the South American Sports Organisation (ODESUR). In order to participate, all athletes must be entered by their National Olympic Committee. There are 15 countries from South America, Central America and the Caribbean invited by ODESUR to participate in the South American Games. The Games are held every four years.

Introduction of Equestrian sport in the South American Games dates back to 1978, but it has been sporadic, some editions taking place with and some without. All Equestrian sports are conducted according to FEI Rules.

The latest edition took place in March 2010 in Medellin (COL). There were 31 sports included in this edition.

The South American Games (a.k.a. ODESUR Games; Spanish: Juegos Sudamericanos; Portuguese: Jogos Sul-Americanos), formerly the Southern Cross Games (Spanish: Juegos Cruz del Sur) are a regional multi-sport event held between nations from South America, organized by the South American Sports Organization (Organización Deportiva Sudamericana, ODESUR).


The first Games were held in 1978 in La Paz, Bolivia. They have since been held every four years; the last edition was in Medellín, Colombia in March 2010. Which will be followed by the 2014 edition in Santiago, Chile The Games have had an equivalent to the Olympic Flame since their inception: the South American Flame, which is relayed from Tiahuanaco, Bolivia, to the host city.

For the XI edition in 2018 there are two bids: Cochabamba, Bolivia and Barquisimeto, Venezuela. A host will be elected by 2011.
The detailed history of the South American Games together with an extensive list of medal winners was published in a book written (in Spanish) by Argentinian journalist Ernesto Rodríguez III with support of the Comité Olímpico Argentino under the auspices of the Ministerio de Educación de la Nación in collaboration with the Secretaría de Deporte de la Nación.


The South American Games (a.k.a. ODESUR Games; Spanish: Juegos Sudamericanos; Portuguese: Jogos Sul-Americanos), formerly the Southern Cross Games (Spanish: Juegos Cruz del Sur) are a regional multi-sport event held between nations from South America, organized by the South American Sports Organization (Organización Deportiva Sudamericana, ODESUR). 


The first Games were held in 1978 in La Paz, Bolivia. They have since been held every four years; the last edition was in Medellín, Colombia in March 2010. Which will be followed by the 2014 edition in Santiago, Chile The Games have had an equivalent to the Olympic Flame since their inception: the South American Flame, which is relayed from Tiahuanaco, Bolivia, to the host city.


For the XI edition in 2018 there are two bids: Cochabamba, Bolivia and Barquisimeto, Venezuela. A host will be elected by 2011.
The IX South American Games (Spanish: Juegos Sudamericanos; Portuguese: Jogos Sul-Americanos) was a multi-sport event held between 19–30 March 2010 in Medellín, Colombia. The Games were organized by the South American Sports Organization (ODESUR), who awarded the Games to the city with 8 votes over the bid by previous host Santiago, Chile (6 votes). 

Participating nations 2010
 Argentina   Aruba   Bolivia   Brazil   Chile   Colombia   Ecuador   Guyana Netherlands Antilles
  Panama   Paraguay   Peru   Suriname   Uruguay   Venezuela

Families that are in Medellín picking up their children will have a special treat this week. They will be joined by hundreds of athletes, coaches, and journalists from all over South America as Medellín hosts the 2010 South American Games (Juegos Suramericanos). The games start tomorrow (March 19th) and will run through the 30th. I can imagine that hotels will be full and the town will be hopping.
 

There will be athletes from 15 different countries participating in 42 different events (31 different sports). The picture is of the park that will host the games.
 

Here is a little bit of interesting trivia. Like in the Olympics, the game sports an official flame. However, this flame doesn't come from Athens. Nope! It was lit by indigenous priests in Bolivia at the Puerta del Sol (Door of the Sun) in Tiwanaku. The flame then travelled to the airport in La Paz and on to Medellín. Over the past 2 weeks the flame has travelled to different neighborhoods in Medellín and today can be found following the route from Comuna 8-10 to Villa Hermosa to La Candelaria and finally to Pernocta en La Alpujarra. Tomorrow the torch will arrive at Estadio Atanasio Girardot.


The South American Games are the continent’s multi-sports event. Athletes from countries in Central America and the Caribbean also take part in them. The Games are the most important competition of the South American Sports Organization (ODESUR). The South American Games are the continent’s multi-sports event. Athletes from countries in Central America and the Caribbean also take part in them. The Games are the most important competition of the South American Sports Organization (ODESUR).


One of the characteristics of the South American Games is that it gathers Olympic sports, like Athletics and Swimming, as well as other sports, not included in the Olympic program, such as Bowling and Karate. The Games are held every four years. Its first edition took place in November 1978, in La Paz, Bolivia.


The Olympic Flame, a symbol of the union of different nationalities, languages, religions and races for a peaceful world, and a tradition that dates back to the Ancient Olympic Games in Greece, has a South American equivalent: the South American Flame. In June 1978, during its 3rd congress, ODESUR (South American Sports Organization) decided that the Bolivian city of Tiahuanaco, for its historical significance, would be the starting point of the Flame for every edition of the South America Games.

On every edition of the Olympic Games, the Flame is lit in the ruins of the city of Olympia, Greece, and torch-bearers take turns carrying it on a journey that ends in the Host City, on the first day of the Games. That’s when, in the Opening Ceremony, the final torchbearer lights the monumental cauldron of the Olympic Stadium. The Flame will remain lit for the duration of the Games and is extinguished at the Closing Ceremony.


The South American Flame is lit during an ancient ceremony in historic ruins of Tiahuanaco and taken to the Host City of the Games. Located on the shore of the Titicaca Lake, in the Andes, Tiahuanaco was the centre of the great Amawta civilization, which ruled most of South America during XI and XII centuries. The Amawta civilization boasted high technological and artistic knowledge and was richer and more powerful than the Incas themselves.


Along the seven editions of the South American Games, the Flame was carried by several important athletes such as Peruvian Cecilia Tai, volleyball silver medallist at the Seoul 1988 Olympic Games. In the latest edition of the Games, the South American Flame was lit by the Amawta council of Tiahuanaco on the 18th of June 2002 and relayed to the Brazilian cities of Belém, Curitiba, Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo.

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